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When you’re in marketing, you’re used to the outrageous. Why? Because the outrageous ideas are usually the thought-provoking, action-driving hooks that really drive a product to notoriety. Because, and this is the truth, when something is outrageous AND good AND people are talking about it, it’s like a trifecta of brilliance. And that’s exactly what happened at Digital Summit 2019 in Atlanta, over and over again: The Trifecta of Brilliance.

From video marketing strategies to tips for understanding your audience, the conference was abuzz for two days about what’s happening now, and what we can expect in the future. Our favorite takeaways? All outrageous. Check ‘em out below.

1. “Change your name to ‘CBD Blockchain’ and you will raise millions in venture capital.”  – Randi Zuckerberg, Zuckerberg Media

What it means and what you should do about it: We all know about the importance of good SEO — and many of us also know about how hot the terms CBD and blockchain are as well. But that’s not the point. Here’s the point: If all of us are too SEO-focused in our marketing, we’d never sell anything different than the person next to us because we’d always be selling the same thing.

Does anyone remember the frozen yogurt boom a few years ago? Everyone went to open a shop, whether or not they were actually well-suited for owning a frozen yogurt store. That’s essentially what Randi is warning against here with SEO keywords. While they’re smart to use in practice, there’s a science behind it, and following a strategic and localized SEO plan should always be paired with a unique and authentic message about what you’re actually marketing. Otherwise, you’ll put all your energy into chasing a phantom keyword and forget to invest in what makes your brand different.    

2. “When people fall in love with you, it’s easier to part them from their funds.” – Beverly Jackson, MGM Resorts International

What it means and what you should do about it: MGM Resorts owns The Strip, and Beverly Jackson owns MGM marketing. So in the land of “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” Jackson is the big man on campus, and if she says to make your audience love you, you better find a way to make your audience love you. To do that, take Jackson’s best practice for closing the gap between like and love to heart: Create storytelling that doesn’t hide its purpose. In other words: Only create stories that exist to sell.

So here’s your takeaway: Don’t be coy in your content about why you’re asking readers to pay attention to you, that just complicates things. Instead, find a way to tell your story with purpose, so that you’re selling with finesse.

3. “Marketing and sales roles are like vampires and werewolves. I’ll let you choose which one is which.” – Ty Heath, LinkedIn

What it means and what you should do about it: I’m not inclined to make the assumption about who is who. What am I inclined to suggest is that sales and marketing are both mythical creatures in this comparison and that if you asked a couple of different people, you’d probably get people who think one way, and others who think the other. Why? Because the characteristics of what makes a marketer and what makes a salesperson is shifting, and dramatically. Nowadays, both roles are more hybrid than ever before, and both can learn from each.

So next time you’re in a marketing rut, consider putting on your sales glasses and trying to sort the problem from a different mindset. I’m not suggesting that you go out and try to suck your audience dry, but it is important to understand the hybrid nature of sales and marketing these days, and that ultimately, the more technology plays a role in our day-to-day, the closer the two will get. So learn from what the other guy has to say — he might have just the insights you need to move forward.

4. “I went to North Carolina and it was cold. My wife said: ‘Wear a hat, it’s where you lose the most body heat.’ Now I’ve heard that before, it’s a pretty accepted thing. It’s even in the army field manual. But do you know how much body heat you lose from your head? Seven percent — the same as any other part of your body. So you know what? We’re all liars.” – Daniel Codella, Wrike

What it means and what you should do about it: Things we know “collectively” are easy to pass along — even if they’re wrong. And despite attempts to correct it, some things just stick in people’s minds.

How does this apply to marketing? Sometimes you’re going to have an uphill battle when it comes to changing someone’s mindset about something. You might have data-backed research for miles, but if you’re not utilizing it in a way that’s receptive to people, they’re not going to forget what they already know — especially if you’re telling them that something they SWEAR is true is actually false. My advice? Take your time when it comes to rattling the cage and trying to prove someone wrong. After all, you never want to come off as preachy or rebellious. So digest your information, the state of the market, and what you’re ultimately trying to get your audience to do. That way, you’re moving forward with clarity, and hopefully, success.

5. “We need to stop posting shit. Excuse my French.” – Antoine Dupont, Katapult Marketing

What it means and what you should do about it: Antoine Dupont, a master marketer who worked for Gordon Ramsay (and yes, he’s also a French national), doesn’t need any explanation. When he delivered his talk about boosting your revenue with video marketing, this quote was absolutely clear: Only post the good stuff. ‘Nuff said.

Have a favorite quote, takeaway, or tip from #DSATL 2019 that we didn’t post about here? Tweet, FB, or Instagram us with the deets! We’d love to hear from you.

Maggie Harney

Author Maggie Harney

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